The Dwindling (Active) Church Member

From Dr. Rick Chromey, some thoughts on church reform – from revisiting the nature and length of sermons to providing more time to connect authentically, from considering new perspectives on worship to reminding ourselves of the central position of sacraments. Enjoy!

VERTICAL CHURCH

EmptyPewHouston has a problem.  So does Phoenix, Seattle, Denver, St. Louis and other cities.

But it ain’t just in the big towns.  Small town and rural USAmerica are experiencing the crunch too.  It’s a problem so big that Thom Rainer, a notable church researcher rightly observed:

“About 20 years ago, a church member was considered active in the church if he or she attended three times a week.  Today, a church member is considered active in the church if he or she attends three times a month.”

In his apologetic, Rainer cites five reasons for this shift:

  1. The local church has been minimized.
  2. Americans idolize their activities.
  3. We take vacations from church.
  4. Members aren’t held to high expectations.
  5. Churches make infrequent attendees leaders.

While I appreciate Rainer’s astute analysis, I do think the real reasons are much deeper, even different.  Yes, times have changed.  There’s no question the local church has lost…

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2 thoughts on “The Dwindling (Active) Church Member

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    1. I love hearing similar things from other generations and even people inside the church – makes us know we’re not alone in advocating for positive change!

      Liked by 1 person

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